Category Archives: Book reviews

What we’ve been reading

little-paris-bookshop October 17

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George This is a wonderful novel about a floating bookshop on the Seine and its unusual proprietor Monsieur Jean Perdu. Jean has a unique way of selling books, as he sees himself as a Literary Apothecary and prescribes books based on the customers emotional status at that time. Whether […]

questions October 14

Questions of travel

The whole way through this long (oh by gosh it is especially, tediously long!) novel The Questions of Travel, I did not have questions of travel, I just had the one question “why am I reading this?” Firstly I LOVE to travel. I thought that this award winning book would be a delight. I was […]

kitchen October 12

The Kitchen daughter

Ginny Selvaggio has always managed her quirks with strict parameters set out by her mother. She rationalises that she is “normal” by firmly reminding herself that normal does not in fact exist. Ginny does acknowledge that hiding in the walk in wardrobe with your hands shoved in your mum’s fluffy slippers is not quite standard […]

bonesetters October 10

The Bonesetter’s Daughter

The Bonesetter’s daughter is a haunting Chinese tale that reveals family truths and secrets that had been seemingly hidden in the confused corridors of an Alzheimer’s sufferers mind. American born Ruth has always found her mother LuLing to be difficult, stubborn and unwilling to let go of her Chinese past. LuLing displays a reluctance to […]

The Last Duchess

The Last Duchess by Jenny Barden. Post by Sandra Taylor. The Last Duchess by Jenny Barden is a wonderful descriptive novel of early tudor England and the very different conditions encountered by the early settlers at Ronoake Island in the New World.  The story follows the adventures of Emme, a lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth I […]

No Man’s Nightingale

No Man’s Nightingale by Ruth Rendell Post by Sandra Taylor. A mystery novel by Ruth Rendell.  This novel appeals on many levels.  It is a fascinating insight into human foibles, prejudices and characteristics. A retired detective assists a friend, who  has replaced him, in solving the mystery of a murder of a  vicar who had […]

shadow year September 28

A Shadow Year.

A Shadow Year by Hannah Richell. Post by Sandra Taylor. I enjoyed reading  “A Shadow Year”  by Hannah Richell.  A group of young people decide to turn their backs on convention and society for a year and live out their dreams in an abandoned cottage In the wilds of the Peak District in England.  Living […]

102927 September 27

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

  I’ve decided since reading this and The Remains of the Day, that Ishiguro is a master of portraits of tragic repression. In this novel, it is our narrator, Kath who is incapable of feeling the anger and injustice which has been done to her by her society which relegates her to a useful container […]

quiet power September 27

Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking

Quiet:  the power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking by Susan Cain Post by Caroline Podd. This book is a must read for anybody who has been told “speak up”, “come out of your shell” and “you’re too quiet”.  Susan Cain celebrates the characteristics that introverts bring to society.  She discusses how […]

Tales about gardens for children

Tales About Gardens by Dr Richard Whitlow. Dr Richard Whitlow is a gardener from the Gold Coast in Australia who has written a lovely new series of books designed to answer the questions which kid’s ask about the things around them and how they work, such as ‘why is the sky blue’, and, ‘what makes […]