Tag Archives: fiction

August 08

The Ice-cream makers

According to The Ice-Cream Makers family legacy, it was Giovanni and Luca Talamini’s great grandfather who invented “ices” or ice-cream in Northern Italy . Three generations later, the same gelataria in Rotterdam, the Netherlands is being run by a man of the same dynasty. Every Spring the family travels to the ice-cream parlour and they return […]

June 30

Bird box

Bird Box by Josh Malerman.  This is one creepy book. A certain something causes madness, homicidal and suicidal rages in those who see it. Starting with a few isolated cases in Russia before spreading across the globe this post-apocalyptic novel exudes almost unbearable tension. The only way to survive is to effectively ‘blind’ oneself: board […]

June 28

The Mother’s Promise

The Mother’s Promise by Sally Hepworth is a chick-flick movie in book form. If you like a tear-jerker story with extra spoons of saccharine, you’ll love this! Let me introduce you to the characters. Alice, single mother, diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a dismal looking prognosis. Her fifteen year old daughter, Zoe who suffers with […]

June 26

Signed, Mata Hari

“Mata Hari”….two words that are known to quicken the pulse of many a man. Mata Hari was reputed for being transfixing, suggestive, alluring and captivating. Mata Hari (or “Eye of the Sun”) is so much more exotic than Margaretha Zelle, but the two are one and the same.  Margaretha was born in the Netherlands. In […]

June 12

Thunder Point by Jack Higgins

Thunder Point is a throwback to the era of Alistair Maclean and Hammond Innes, and is a great rollicking yarn. I really enjoyed this book and I think it was made better because I listened to it via audiobook and the narrator was a master at managing the various accents and dialects. It is the […]

The Midwife of Venice

The Midwife of Venice by Roberta Rich is a historical novel that offers the reader a peep into “women’s business” in the year of 1575 in Venice. Hannah is a Jewish midwife and reputed to be the best. She has a secret. A device she refers to as her “birthing spoons”, a primitive version of […]

April 25

Lest we forget “Sunflower”

Sunflower by Colin McLaren is the fascinating story of “An Anzac, who in his search of adventure and love, gave himself to a dream and survived a nightmare” (Prologue, page 3).  Nineteen year old George Dawson Bingham worked the railway lines as a ganger when Australia joined the efforts of The Great War. George Dawson […]

Farewell: A mansion in occupied Istanbul

The novel Farewell: A mansion in occupied Istanbul by Ayse Kulin was brought back by a family member after their travels in Istanbul. The golden award sticker attached to the front of the paperback book said “Best novel award 2008” so I figured the book would be worthy of a look even though I didn’t know […]

The Girl from Venice

The setting for Martin Cruz Smith’s new novel The Girl from Venice is the inspiring beauty and uniqueness of Venice which fortuitously was saved from the bombing raids of World War II.  It remains intact in all its glory – maybe until nature decides otherwise – and provides the background scenery for this wartime love story. […]

The Oracle of Stamboul

The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael David Lukas is the most exquisite fairy tale of a novel. It is magical, atmospheric and divinely beautiful.  According to an ancient prophecy, dictated by a King on his deathbed, a child would be born who would be the Oracle of Stamboul and according to the midwife, who brought […]