Tag Archives: fiction

June 12

Thunder Point by Jack Higgins

Thunder Point is a throwback to the era of Alistair Maclean and Hammond Innes, and is a great rollicking yarn. I really enjoyed this book and I think it was made better because I listened to it via audiobook and the narrator was a master at managing the various accents and dialects. It is the […]

The Midwife of Venice

The Midwife of Venice by Roberta Rich is a historical novel that offers the reader a peep into “women’s business” in the year of 1575 in Venice. Hannah is a Jewish midwife and reputed to be the best. She has a secret. A device she refers to as her “birthing spoons”, a primitive version of […]

April 25

Lest we forget “Sunflower”

Sunflower by Colin McLaren is the fascinating story of “An Anzac, who in his search of adventure and love, gave himself to a dream and survived a nightmare” (Prologue, page 3).  Nineteen year old George Dawson Bingham worked the railway lines as a ganger when Australia joined the efforts of The Great War. George Dawson […]

Farewell: A mansion in occupied Istanbul

The novel Farewell: A mansion in occupied Istanbul by Ayse Kulin was brought back by a family member after their travels in Istanbul. The golden award sticker attached to the front of the paperback book said “Best novel award 2008” so I figured the book would be worthy of a look even though I didn’t know […]

The Girl from Venice

The setting for Martin Cruz Smith’s new novel The Girl from Venice is the inspiring beauty and uniqueness of Venice which fortuitously was saved from the bombing raids of World War II.  It remains intact in all its glory – maybe until nature decides otherwise – and provides the background scenery for this wartime love story. […]

The Oracle of Stamboul

The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael David Lukas is the most exquisite fairy tale of a novel. It is magical, atmospheric and divinely beautiful.  According to an ancient prophecy, dictated by a King on his deathbed, a child would be born who would be the Oracle of Stamboul and according to the midwife, who brought […]

The Things we keep

In The Things we keep by Sally Hepworth, the story is not always revealed in a linear presentation and sometimes the story can be momentarily confusing however this simply helps the reader to experience the general feeling of befuddlement, a sensation that dementia sufferers are only too familiar with. Anna finds herself adjust from being […]

January 24

Taking the Titanic by James Patterson with Scott Slaven

The world of decreasing attention spans and limited time has made its way to publishing. Marketed with taglines including “What if someone wrote novels… without any of the boring parts?” and “All killer, no filler.” – James Patterson’s Bookshots series entered the market in June last year and already has more than 30 titles available. As an avid James […]

December 23

The Sandalwood Tree

The Sandalwood tree by Elle Newmark tells dual tales of Evie & Martin and Felicity & Adela. Set in 1947, Americans Evie and Martin Mitchell and their five year old son are living in an Indian village whilst historian Martin documents a country on the verge of partition. Rewind ninety three years to 1854 when […]

December 21

The Light Between Oceans

The plan was conceived by despair, and birthed in remote isolation and anonymity. The lighthouse keeper and his wife live a Spartan life. Their wants and needs are relatively simple. That is until a small boat washes up on the remote Janus Island’s treacherous rocks. The occupants of the small vessel are a young baby, and […]